Why I Don’t Imagine I’ll Ever Become An Atheist

Why I don’t see myself becoming an atheist:

The short answer:

I don’t see what atheism has to offer me.

The long answer:

If I were to wake up tomorrow morning and think to myself You know, I don’t want to do the whole ‘God’ thing anymore, other than not taking part in Catholic ceremonies (like the mass), I don’t see how my life would change.

For example: Let’s talk about sex.

Image result for austin powers ya baby

My Catholic faith says “Don’t have sex until marriage.”

And, as an atheist, I would say the same thing I say now: “Sounds like a good idea.”

Here’s why:

If everything goes the way it’s supposed to during sex, 9 months later my lady will push a bundle of joy out of her.

And in order to ensure that my kid is, in the words of Joe Esperanto, “The best around” (who no one will keep down), than my lady and I should be married. If for no other reason than to help make sure that, one day, one of us doesn’t choose to make like a banana and split. Because divorce is not a choice made lightly.

What about being “logical”?

What do I mean?

This:

In atheist circles, I’ve heard of an emphasis on using logic — not accepting things on faith.

And to that, I say: “Sounds good.”

Be logical.

Be rational.

Be all that jazz.

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Here’s the thing:

Just because I believe in a god doesn’t mean that I don’t believe 2 + 2 = 4.

My belief in God is just that: Belief.

Do I know for a fact that there is a god?

Nope.

And I never want to claim to.

“Why believe in a god?” you might be asking.

2 reasons, off the top of my head, for why I believe:

  1. I believe evil exists. I’ve seen and heard enough about demonic possession to believe that there is something dark going on there. Not everyone claiming to be possessed can be faking it, or suffering from some other condition.
  2. I’m prideful. Believing in someone greater than me keeps me humble.

On another note:

I think even the most hardcore atheist would, mostly, agree with the 10 Commandments.

For example: Whether you’re religious or non-religious, I think we can both agree that murdering people is not what a law-abiding citizen would do. Thou shalt not kill.

In conclusion:

Other than not going to Catholic ceremonies (like the mass) I don’t see how my life would change if I became an atheist.

Despite my belief in a god, I don’t see myself as irrational because my belief is just: Belief. I’m not claiming that I have and know, with certainty, all the answers.

So, the way I see it, what harm is there in believing in a god? As long as I still believe that 2 + 2 = 4 and that all of a person’s organs need to stay inside their body, I would say I’m in good shape.

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11 thoughts on “Why I Don’t Imagine I’ll Ever Become An Atheist

  1. As someone who had been a devout Christian and became an atheist, I can confirm most of what you say, here. Atheism hasn’t really provided me much in the way of reward– in fact, in a number of ways, it has actually made my life more difficult. Nor have I really changed much in the way of morals– for example, I’m still very much Pro-Life.

    I didn’t become an atheist because I wanted to be an atheist. I became an atheist because I found I could no longer believe that God exists.

  2. First of all, atheists don’t wake up one morning like you said and just decide no more God. At least that’s not what happened to me when I lost faith in God. It was a gradual decline until I wasn’t sure if God existed at all and couldn’t bring myself to pray to Him. (Mind you I felt pretty guilty and confused.) Just because you’re an atheist doesn’t mean you’re on a sex free-for-all. There’s a time and place to have sex and, frankly, having a baby can and will ruin a woman’s life if say she’s in high school. In those 9 months she will have to drop out of high school, find multiple jobs to support herself and her baby, and there’s no guarantee the father will stick around. Given that atheists use logic, they would know it’s probably best not to have sex if they’re not even financially ready to handle a child.

    As for you personally, you’re not harming anyone by believing in God, but some people like to take their faith and use it to discriminate against others. (You know what I’m talking about.) Although, I don’t believe their religion is the problem here. They just happen to use their faith as a basis for discrimination because they have it. They could probably use other mediums as well to “justify” their discrimination if necessary.

    That’s why I really appreciate you. You don’t shove your ideals down people’s throats or use your beliefs as a weapon against others. 🙂

    1. “First of all, atheists don’t wake up one morning like you said and just decide no more God.”

      I know.

      With this post, while I am talking about a serious subject — the choice to become an atheist — I’m trying to do it in a humorous, laid-back manner.

      That’s why my hypothetical choice to become an atheist is written the way it is — as something I just decide one morning.

      “At least that’s not what happened to me when I lost faith in God. It was a gradual decline until I wasn’t sure if God existed at all and couldn’t bring myself to pray to Him. (Mind you I felt pretty guilty and confused.)”

      So, these posts are no longer relevant?

      1: https://confessionsofareborngirl.wordpress.com/2016/09/13/god-saved-my-life-today/
      2: https://confessionsofareborngirl.wordpress.com/2016/11/30/30-days-of-thankfulness-day-30/

      “Just because you’re an atheist doesn’t mean you’re on a sex free-for-all.”

      I know.

      The point I was trying to get across is: Without, in my case, the Catholic Church’s rule of “Don’t have sex until marriage,” I would have one less reason to not have sex whenever I chose. That, obviously, doesn’t mean that I’ll be on a “sex free-for-all,” but it does mean that I would view sex slightly differently than I do now: I would still believe that sex is something that should wait for marriage, just for a different reason.

      “There’s a time and place to have sex and, frankly, having a baby can and will ruin a woman’s life if say she’s in high school. In those 9 months she will have to drop out of high school, find multiple jobs to support herself and her baby, and there’s no guarantee the father will stick around.”

      I agree.

      “Given that atheists use logic…”

      I use logic.

      “…some people like to take their faith and use it to discriminate against others.”

      I agree.

      “That’s why I really appreciate you. You don’t shove your ideals down people’s throats or use your beliefs as a weapon against others.”

      Thank you.

      1. Oh no sorry to confuse you. There was a point in my life when I lost faith in God but I’m a believer now.

      2. Thank you for your reply.

        You didn’t offend me at all.

        Reading your comment, I got the impression that you were going through a hard time right now — not talking about a hard time you had previously gone through, like you made clear moments ago — and, thus, I was worried about you.

        I was glad that you seemed to have found a measure of peace, but at the same time was sad that you had suffered so much. I wanted to do whatever I could to help you.

        I’m glad you’re doing fine — I’m glad my fears were dispelled.

        And I still will do whatever I can to help you if you find yourself going through a hard time.

        I wouldn’t say that you got carried away.

        Your passion was clearly evident. And that’s fine with me. Everyone is passionate about something.

        For example: I’m passionate about the human body being seen as more than its sexual aspects, as the multitude of posts I’m written about nudity will attest.

        Thank you again for commenting on my post. (And Liking it.)

        You Liking or commenting on a post of mine always brightens my day.

        It’s always fun talking to you. I always enjoy hearing about your experiences. And I want to do what I can to help you be the best person you can be.

        I’m glad you see me as a person who doesn’t force their beliefs on others — an example of a “good Christian” — and I want to keep on being that person: I want to be the kind of person that you are proud to know.

      3. You know your comment just about made my day. It’s the nicest thing I’ve heard in a while. 🙂 Have a nice day.

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