Who, And What, Do American Christians Put Their Faith In?

Recently I’ve been spending time looking at Tom Snyder’s tweets.

If I had to describe his tweets in one word, that word would be “Fear.”

That got me thinking…

To quote George R.R. Martin:

“All men must die.”

Game of Thrones

And, if you’re  a Christian, you believe that Jesus has conquered death.

Jesus11

So:

If death is 1) An unavoidable part of life, and 2) Something that has lost its sting because of Jesus’ death on the cross, than:

What is there to be afraid of?

To a Christian, death is not supposed to be the worst thing ever. Losing your soul is supposed to be.

For what does it profit a man to gain the whole world and forfeit his soul? (Mark 8:36)

When I see tweets like the one above, I wonder:

Where is your faith, Tom Snyder? Is it in America, or Jesus?

Nowadays, Christians seem to have a tendency to put their faith in America…

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Who told these people that they could just pack up and invade Europe, including Scandinavian countries in the far north, much less countries like the United States of America?*

…not in Jesus.

I’m not implying that nothing should be done to stop Islamic extremism. Terrorists should be stopped.

I just, as a Christian (specifically, as a Catholic), refuse to live my life fearing death and destruction.

On a final note:

Dying is not something I want to do, but I can think of worse fates than death.

Like Hell.

Or being forced to watch The Garbage Pail Kids Movie (1987).

*Emphasis mine. That is an excerpt from They Aren’t Refugees; They’re Invaders! by Tom Snyder

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2 thoughts on “Who, And What, Do American Christians Put Their Faith In?

  1. And, unrepentant sinners who go to Hell don’t really want to be with Jesus anyway, so Hell seems to be the place they truly want to be. No one is preaching fear all the time, so this is taking things out of context to promote weird, aberrant debating points. The American cross is an icon supporting America’s return to Jesus and His Gospel in all its fullness, including its definition of what is evil and how to truly overcome it, which is thru Jesus. If a pagan or a nonbeliever is overtly presented with Jesus and the Gospel, but still rejects it, then he’s not on his way to Heaven (unless, of course, he changes his mind later).

    1. “…promote weird, aberrant debating points.”

      You say I’m promoting weird, aberrant points, and yet you don’t say what those points are.

      Back up what you say with evidence.

      “If a pagan or a nonbeliever is overtly presented with Jesus and the Gospel, but still rejects it, then he’s not on his way to Heaven (unless, of course, he changes his mind later).”

      Only God knows a person’s heart.

      So: Even if a person says “I don’t like the message of the Gospel,” I’m not going to say “They’re on their way to Hell,” because I don’t know exactly why they don’t like the message of the Gospel.

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