Why Do People Like Being Naked?

Why do people like being naked?

The reason I think people feel better when naked is because naked is the state that we are created in. God created Adam and Eve naked without shame (Genesis 2:25). And, as babies, we come into the world naked.

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We don’t live in the Garden of Eden anymore, and we’re not babies anymore. But I think people see being naked as a reminder of those simpler times. That would explain why people feel a sense of peace while naked, or feel sad about having to put on clothes again. Because, while naked, a person feels more like their, for lack of a better term, “true self,” and clothes hide that “true self.” Clothes implicitly say “Who you naturally are must be hidden.” And so people feel a sense of relief and freedom when they don’t have to hide anymore. People can take off their clothes and say, with certainty, “This is me.”

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The reason we wear clothes is so that people won’t be as tempted to see each other as objects for their enjoyment, not as human beings.

…they realized they were naked; so they sewed fig leaves together and made coverings for themselves. (Genesis 3:7)

But: Despite the imperfect world we live in, the naked human body is still inherently “very good.” (Genesis 1:31)

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6 thoughts on “Why Do People Like Being Naked?

  1. Mostly a good article. Yet you write, “The reason we wear clothes is so that people won’t be as tempted to see each other as objects for their enjoyment, not as human beings.” I challenge you to consider whether clothes, in fact, reduce that particular temptation or tendency. Colossians 2:16-23 suggests that such rules have no effect on our sinful desires. Only a heart change can transform our desires into God’s desires. “…but be transformed by the renewing of your mind…” (Romans 12:2)

    1. That’s a good question:

      “Do clothes reduce the temptation/tendency to see people as objects, not human beings?”

      Since I am not a nudist, I can’t say how going naked, and being among other people who are naked, has effected how I see people.

      But: Because of Adam’s and Eve’s sin, we are not perfect. We can’t see each other exactly like Adam and Eve saw each other. In this imperfect world, we can’t be “naked without shame” to the extent that Adam and Eve were before the Fall. (Genesis 2:25)

      It is an unfortunate fact about nudism that there are people who identify as nudists for evil reasons.

      For example:

      1. From reading accounts of people who grew up in nudist communities, I learned of how kids would be taken off into the woods, or to some other secluded spot, to have their picture taken, and then that picture would end up on some pornographic DVD.

      2. On Twitter, I ran across a nudist group that was posting pornographic content and claiming that it was “only natural.” (I never looked at the content, but people who posted it called it “porn” and said it was “natural.”)

      3. I read a story about a woman who was duped into appearing in pornographic videos because the people making the videos told her “These are movies for nudists.”

      My point is:

      I believe that the intentions of nudism are good. As far as I understand it, the intentions of nudism are: “Spreading the word that a person is more than their body, and the body is more than the sexual pleasure that it can give a person.”

      But, unfortunately:

      Intentions and reality are two different things. You don’t have to look long to find examples of people using nudism as a cover, or as justification, for their evil acts.

      What I’m trying to say is:

      Nudism — going naked — will not guarantee that a person is seen as a human being and not an object.

      And:

      Clothes won’t guarantee that a person is seen as human being, either. You don’t have to look long to find examples of fully-clothed people being taken advantage of and valued only for their sexuality.

      But:

      I believe that clothes can help a person to see their fellow human being as a human being and not an object. For example: If I were walking down a street, and I saw a woman walking towards me, though I believe that the body is created by God and is inherently good, and that a person is more than their body, there would be a greater risk of me seeing the woman as a means to attain pleasure if she was naked than if she was clothed. I wish I could look at a naked woman and just see her as a beautiful creation of God, like how Adam saw Eve before the Fall. But I’m not perfect. Imperfection — lust — is something I will struggle with until the day I (hopefully) pass through the pearly gates.

      Nudist or textile, we all struggle, in one way or another, with lust, with sin, with our own imperfection.

      The reason why is:

      Though God can change our hearts and renew our minds, that doesn’t mean we still won’t struggle with sin.

      “For I do not understand my own actions. For I do not do what I want, but I do the very thing I hate.” ~ The Apostle Paul (Romans 7:15)

      If Jesus’ own apostles struggled with sin — the people who literally walked with Jesus — that means we, Christians, are no less imperfect, either.

      Though I am not a nudist, I believe that nudism can help people to see their fellow human beings as people, not objects.

      But there will still always be that struggle to keep on seeing human beings as people and not as objects. And it is because of that, that, though clothes are no guarantee that a person will be treated with respect, I believe clothes do increase the chances of a person being treated with respect.

      When Adam and Eve ate the fruit, they didn’t think “I trust Adam to always love me and respect me even though I’m naked,” or “I know Eve will still see me as a human being even though I’m naked.” Adam’s and Eve’s first action was to cover up: To implicitly say “Don’t look at my penis/vagina, look at my face — see me as a human being, not as a means of attaining pleasure.”

      Adam’s and Eve’s first action, upon eating the fruit, was to put on clothes.

      1. This is how many of us who grew up in churches were conditioned to think. And yes, it is conditioning. But what if I were to tell you that, with God’s help, we can recondition ourselves to see nakedness as the most holy state?

        For this is what many nudists have found. I am now no more, indeed less, likely to lust after a nude woman than a clothed one. Granted, I was determined to find out whether that could be done, but it was surprisingly easy.

        (Have you checked out mychainsaregone.org? A wonderful site that explains what I have little time to write now.)

      2. “…what if I were to tell you that, with God’s help, we can recondition ourselves to see nakedness as the most holy state?”

        I (mostly) agree with you on that.

        The reason I say “mostly” is because I don’t know how a person would evaluate states of being in order to find out which one is the most holy.

        But, I agree that being naked is a holy state of being: God created Adam and Eve naked, and as babies we come into the world naked. Naked is our natural state of being. When a person is naked while praying, they aren’t just showing God all that they are mentally, spiritually, and emotionally, because of the prayers they’re saying, they are showing God all that they are physically, too, because they’ve stripped themselves bare. I believe it’s a humble and beautiful thing to come before God naked.

        I’ve written two prayers for nudists, and “6 Commandments” for nudists, in order to do what I can to help people get the most out of their choice to go naked:

        1. https://timothyach.wordpress.com/2016/02/11/a-prayer-for-nudists-2/
        2. https://timothyach.wordpress.com/2016/05/27/another-prayer-for-nudists/
        3. https://timothyach.wordpress.com/2016/04/07/6-commandments-for-nudists/

        “For this is what many nudists have found. I am now no more, indeed less, likely to lust after a nude woman than a clothed one.”

        I’m glad.

        Not everyone on Earth will be a nudist. And there are people who go naked for evil reasons.

        But: I’m overjoyed when I learn of how going naked has helped a person. I’ve heard of how going naked has helped people to recover from trauma they’d suffered, or helped people to care for their body more, and I think that’s a wonderful thing. It sounds like God was using those peoples’ choice to go naked to help them — to draw them closer to Him in some way.

        And I’m glad that going naked means that you are less likely to lust.

        Nudism isn’t for everyone, but for the people it is for: I think God can, and has been, working wonders.

        I’m glad that nudism has helped people live better lives and helped people to have more respect for their fellow human being.

        What I was trying to communicate to you in my reply to your comment on my post, was:

        We will all, nudist or textile, struggle with sin. One person’s struggle is different than another’s, but that doesn’t make the struggle any less real. Because of that: I don’t think it’s possible for a person to “break their chains” completely — to completely transcend the sinful impulses we are born with as a result of Adam’s and Eve’s sin. That doesn’t mean that a man can’t look at a naked woman with pure intentions and see her as the beautiful creation that she is. It just means that there will always be a struggle, however brief, between loving and lusting.

        I’m not saying that you think you have “broken your chains” completely — I’m just saying that the “chains” (sinful impulses) will always be there, however small and brittle they might be:

        “Original Sin: The tendency to sin innate in all human beings, held to be inherited from Adam in consequence of the Fall.”

        I had heard of “mychainsaregone.org” and I started reading more of their articles when you mentioned them. They’re interesting.

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